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Poisonous Plants

Poisonous Plants And Harmful Substances to Pets

There are many beautiful flowers that contain toxic substances or poisonous plants to pets.
indoor-plant-cat
 

Indoors

Avoid house plants that are known for being harmful to pets or keep them
out of reach.

If your cat loves plants, you can buy oat grass or catnip plant which is cat friendly.

Your dog is best to be supervised next to indoor plants, apart from the potential hazard, you do not want your plant destroyed.

cat-outdoor-plants

 

Outdoors

Most pets love to chew on plants and grass.

It may not be practical to control your pet in the garden.  Certainly it will would take the fun out running free.

Grass is not harmful as such, however if treated with chemicals like Evergreen and Weedkiller, it can be lethal for your cat and dog.

When walking the dog in the woods or country side, prevent your dog from eating wild mushrooms.

Most harmful plants to humans, are more so to pets.  If in doubt, leave them out!

If your pet is experiencing vomiting, diarrhea, foaming salivation or difficulty in breathing, take your pet to the Vet immediately. 

cat-plants

 

In case the poisonous substance was ingested in front of you, take a sample with you to show the Vets.  It may help them understand what they are dealing with faster.

There are over 700 plants with toxic substances to your cat and dog. 

These are the most common harmful plants:
Aloe Vera, Amarylis, Azale,  Begonia, Carnation, Chrysanthemums, Daffodil, Lilies, Ivy, Hosta, Morning Glory, Rhododendron, Tomato Plant, Tulips and Yew.

There are also foods that are toxic to pets:

Avocado, alcohol, bread (specially yeast dough), chives, chocolate (made for human consumption), coffee, garlic, grapes, milk, most nuts, onions and raisins.
Even sugar free sweets can be harmful like xylitol or aspartame, a chemical sweetener also known as amino sweet, causing cancer also for humans.

For an extensive list of Harmful or Poisonous Plants from the Humane Society click here

 

Home products that are toxic to pets:


Anti-freeze (ethylene glycol), weed killer, cleaning products containing phenol or Lysol disinfectant, plug in air freshener, spray air freshener, fly killer spray, mothballs, bleach, potpourri, human medicine, pesticides, flea control designed for other species, paint, nail polish, deodorant, petrol and shoe polish amongst the most common household products.

Most poisoning incidents can be avoided by keeping harmful substances away from pets or by simply using a different product.

It is not all about poisonous plants.
Pet owners are becoming more aware of cruelty free products and fortunately choosing to share consumer responsibility by choosing alternative products.
However, more  people need to get involved.  Ignoring the issue is no longer an option.

Animal welfare should go beyond our pets at home.
It is a sad reality that whilst our pets are pampered at home, other rabbits, cats and dogs are still being subjected to lab testing for cosmetic manufacturers.
Whilst one person cannot change the world, collectively consumer choice will eventually dictate product demand and persuade retailers to respond accordingly.

There is a way in which everyone can help:
Perhaps when next time you are shopping for shampoo, soap, perfume, other cosmetics or even washing up liquid, you consider buying alternative products which display the bunny sign as these products are not tested on animals.
Look out for the label BUAV approved companies which support cruelty free products.

Pharmaceutical Manufacturers are responsible for a big part of animal testing in the name of science.  Despite testing on animals  not offering guarantee the safety for human consumption, modern medicine still allows this.

Be aware of Cancer Research Charities that sponsor animal testing experiments in the name of medicine.

There is another alternative with Dr. Hadwen Trust, cancer research is now available and progressing well without having to test on animals.

Dame Judi Dench is the new patron for this humane research trust.  Consider donating to them instead, to find out more about Dr Hadwen Trust click here